How to React When a Buyer Suggests Your Food Product is From Organic Or Not

How to react when a buyer asks if your food product is from organic or not? The words are a bit hard to pronounce in this day and age, but if you have a product that has been processed and your market is asking this question, there is a legal requirement that you answer.

The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) is responsible for ensuring that the standards for organics are being met when a person puts a food product on the shelf. To be certified organic, a product must meet the specific standards set forth by the NOSB.

The label on the back of a bag indicates that the food is organic. What does that mean to consumers? It means that it was grown without the use of pesticides and with a minimal amount of chemical fertilizers.

Even if the producer is using the technology of the Soil Association Biosafety Technology Alliance (BTA), to ensure the safety of their organic produce, they may still be certified organic under the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture). If the producers decide to be labeled organic, they must follow the guidelines set forth by the NOSB. The criteria are outlined in the NOSB Organic Production Guidelines.

Processes that do not qualify as organic may still be called “natural.” They may be produced using the same techniques, but not meet the certification standards. Natural may also be utilized in the production of a non-organic product. Any distinction between the organic and non-organic products is subject to interpretation and cannot be a decision made by the consumer.

How to react when a buyer asks if your food product is from organic or not? The words are a bit hard to pronounce in this day and age, but if you have a product that has been processed and your market is asking this question, there is a legal requirement that you answer. The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) is responsible for ensuring that the standards for organics are being met when a person puts a food product on the shelf.

The label on the back of a bag indicates that the food is organic. What does that mean to consumers? It means that it was grown without the use of pesticides and with a minimal amount of chemical fertilizers.

Even if the producer is using the technology of the Soil Association Biosafety Technology Alliance (BTA), to ensure the safety of their organic produce, they may still be certified organic under the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture). If the producers decide to be labeled organic, they must follow the guidelines set forth by the NOSB.

The criteria are outlined in the NOSB Organic Production Guidelines. It would be best to clarify the difference between organic and natural and how the word biotechnology is actually involved. Many growers are concerned about being labeled organic when their products are genetically modified.

According to the NOSB, the term “GMO” does not apply to products produced through biotechnology. Genetically modified organisms are those produced through the use of genetic engineering techniques. Agribusiness interests, however, have worked hard to change the terminology so that only produce that is not genetically engineered is labeled organic.

Organic is a value derived from principles that are typically set forth in the NOSB Organic Production Guidelines. The guidelines attempt to prevent detrimental impacts on the environment while ensuring that the environment is provided for the benefit of future generations. Green technologies are also covered under these guidelines.

How to react when a buyer asks if your food product is from organic or not? The words are a bit hard to pronounce in this day and age, butif you have a product that has been processed and your market is asking this question, there is a legal requirement that you answer.